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BMC animal care students wag their tails at Crufts

Students took a trip to Crufts this year to learn about animal welfare reforms ...

BMC animal care students wag their tails at Crufts

Students took a trip to Crufts this year to learn about animal welfare reforms ...

BMC animal care students wag their tails at Crufts

Students took a trip to Crufts this year to learn about animal welfare reforms ...
16 March 2012

BMC animal care students wag their tails at Crufts

Sixty six animal care students took a trip to Crufts this year to learn about changes in welfare which will hopefully promote more responsible breeding.

Staff and students visited on Gundog day which was really popular as students are used to working many breeds such as Labradors, Golden Retrievers, Spaniels and Pointers at the BMC kennels.

Students really liked the ‘discover dogs’ area where they got meet and socialise with dogs from every breed category; owners were on hand to give advice, hints and tips on everything from diet, behaviour and grooming of each breed. The shopping area was also a big hit, with plenty of food and freebie giveaways, students interested in animal nutrition were also able to get advice, guidance and goodie bags!
 

The trip was particularly interesting for BMC students from an animal welfare standpoint; since the television programme “Pedigree Dogs Exposed” was broadcast three years ago, the issues around the potential health problems caused by bad breeding has been a very hot topic. Crufts and the Kennel Club in particular have been subject to a lot negative press ever since, and were condemned by RSPCA and BBC for a short period.

The new Chairman of the Kennel Club has bought in new measures to promote health and welfare for the animals present at the show; this includes identification of ‘high profile breeds’ where health issues have been identified and introduction of independent vet checks for animals being judged in the ‘best of breed’ class.

If any dog fails the vet check, it will be removed from the ‘best of breed’ category and in turn the entire breed will be eliminated from the competition. Also, any judge who awards a ‘best of breed’ and is not confirmed by the independent vet must also explain their actions and reasons for choice to the Kennel Club officials.
Here at BMC we give our students plenty of hands-on enrichment like this which enables them to learn outside of the classrooms and have fun at the same time.

To find out more about our Animal Care courses click here.

To view gallery of images click here.
 

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